TagFinance Transformation

CFOs Beware: Don’t Get Caught Up In the Hype of New Technologies

In one of my articles, Finance Transformation: From Efficiency to Effectiveness, I recommended CFOs to first identify a business problem before investing in a new shiny piece of technology.  Today, there is so much talk about digital transformation and the immense potential of new technologies to drive business performance.

With a plethora of tools available on the market and all promising to deliver better results, one of the biggest challenges faced by many CFOs and finance executives  is identifying, evaluating and selecting the right tool for the business.

Compounding the problem are a myriad of  articles and blogs on finance digitization portraying messages such as,  “If you are not yet invested in digital, you have already missed the train or if  you are not using the cloud, be aware that everyone else is moving forward and moving faster than you are.”

For fear of missing out, some finance executives are leading their organizations on digital transformation initiatives without a clearly defined and articulated plan.

Too Many Unconnected Systems

Due to the lack of having a clearly mapped business strategy to address digitization, some finance executives are getting caught up in the hype that inevitably comes with every new piece of technology or software on the market. Instead of investing in technology or software that serves the business, they are investing in new tools that the consultants or software sellers recommend irrespective of whether the decision is rational or not. So often the end product is a disintegrated technological infrastructure.

New technology, combined with streamlined processes and talented people is supposed to transform finance from an inefficient function into an effective team player in the business. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Technology is acting as a hindrance. Businesses are superimposing automation on broken or marginally improved processes in turn expecting magical results. In other instances, finance teams are spending a significant amount of time reconciling and aggregating data from different systems.

Today there is an increasing call on finance to play the role of a strategic advisor to business teams yet when it comes to answering basic performance questions, most finance teams are hard pressed to do so.  One of the reasons being that the information required to answer such important questions is housed in different systems all over the organization.

Further, the individuals responsible for partnering with the business to support decision making lack access to some of the systems. They have to rely on information on spreadsheets or reports produced by those with access and most of the time this information is not readily available.

Imagine the frustration of having to wait on someone for days or weeks to send you information and when the information finally arrives you realize that it is not what you expected. For example, the report is not for the business unit you are reviewing or the period selected for the report is incorrect. Because you don’t have access to the system you have to go back to the report compiler and explain again your information requirements.

This back and forth process slows down decision making at a time when accuracy, speed and agility are increasingly important.

Looking at the same information

One of the keys to have meaningful performance conversations is have everyone look at the same information. For example, if the business wants to review the level and nature of capital investments for a given period it is imperative to ensure that the source of this information is common across the organization.

I have come across situations whereby more than one system is used to record capital expenditures often with major record differences between the systems in use. Time and resources are then redirected to focus on reconciling and resolving the reporting differences. It is therefore imperative for CFOs and finance executives to understand that technology alone will not drive transformation.

The data you input into a system will determine the output of that system. That’s why it is important to make sure that everyone is working from a central data repository. Having multiple copies of solutions is inefficient and counterproductive.

As an organization, you do not need too many systems to look at the same information. Thus, before acquiring that new piece of technology always ask yourself, “What is the problem that this new technology will resolve and also how will the investment enhance or strengthen your existing technological capabilities?” Many at times, we are quick to point out the limitations of the current system and use that as the reason for investing in an alternative solution.

Instead of taking a holistic view of the technological needs of the business, we take a piecemeal approach. For example, if AP is not happy with the current system we invest in another AP-focused system. If another team identifies system deficiencies, we look around on the market for a specific tool that addresses that function. This cycle continues over a period of time and ultimately the organization is left with a handful of siloed pieces of systems not completely integrated into the overall technological infrastructure of the business.

As the business and its information needs evolve, sometimes a reconfiguration of the current system(s) as compared to implementing a new one is what is needed. That is why it is important, from the onset, to evaluate the suitability of each piece of technology against the various growth phases of the business. Ask the software seller, “If our business continues to grow, will your product still be able to support our business needs and help us deliver our unique value proposition?”

Considering all the plausible scenarios and options available will help you determine if the technology will serve you for the short or long-term future.

Fear of missing out

Studies have revealed that as individuals we are prone to mimicking people’s actions and their product choices instead of applying our own independent assessment and best judgement. This not only happens at a personal level but also at a professional level.

For example, imagine as a CFO you recently attended an industry conference and the majority of finance executives you met spoke about investing in AI capabilities. Some have already implemented pilot projects and others are at an advanced planning stage. Since your organization hasn’t made plans yet, you make a hasty decision to invest in AI to avoid missing out and keep pace with what others are doing.

The problem with this simple approach is that rather than initially evaluate AI investment from an internal point of view and your business’s strategy perspective, you are now investing in AI from an external point of view based on what other businesses are doing.

I am not saying it is wrong to collaborate and get ideas from industry peers. In fact, this is one of the key reasons for attending conferences. To get informed about emerging trends and disruptive technologies and prepare for an uncertain future.

What is important is that you don’t allow competitor behaviours to drive technology investments in your business. Rather, clarify your business questions first, fix any broken processes before looking into technology and assess how the investment aligns with your overall business strategy.

3 Common Pitfalls of Performance Reporting and How to Avoid Them

Recently I met up with a close friend of mine whom I hadn’t seen in a couple of years for a chat and catching up. He is a qualified accountant and finance professional working in the financial services industry in Zimbabwe.

On top of the social chatter, we started discussing the evolving role of finance, in particular finance business partnering and the impact of Industry 4.0 on the profession.

As our discussion continued, we shared experiences, what has worked and what hasn’t worked so far in our respective organizations, as well as the way forward.

One thing that intrigued me was that my friend didn’t by any chance try hard to hide his frustrations emanating from his every day job. Chief among the frustrations was the fact that finance wasn’t highly regarded within his organization as he would have loved it to be.

I probed further trying to understand why he had reached to that conclusion.

Although my friend mentioned that his organization has made reasonable progress in ensuring that finance transforms from the commonly perceived scorekeeper function to a trusted business partner, many business leaders still perceive finance’s role as that of balancing books and providing rudimentary analysis.

As a result, finance is not invited to the decision making table and asked for its contribution.

Keen to find out why business leaders didn’t see any value in engaging finance in the operational affairs, I asked deeper questions until we both agreed that his team was clogging business partners with too many performance reports, his organization lacked a clearly defined data management model, and finance personnel need to be empowered to collaborate with the business effectively.

Far Too Many Reports and Far Too Little Insights

As it turns out, it’s not only business leaders in my friend’s place of work who are constantly being weighed down by a mass of performance reports. There are plenty.

With the volume of both internal and external data increasing exponentially, the demand on finance teams to provide insightful, relevant and timely management information to support fact-based decision making isn’t going down either.

Because of this unrelenting demand for more information it is easy to succumb to the thinking that more is better, resulting in finance teams working round-the-clock to produce reports that neither meet the requests of stakeholders nor offer the business an informed, value-adding view of its performance.

The problem with having too many reports is that the business is forced to track and monitor far too many metrics which, in most cases, are in conflict with one another and offer far too little insight.

Additionally, the business lacks a clear line of sight to clearly analyse past and anticipated performance in order to make better decisions. In today’s exponentially growing data age, decision makers are looking for essential information to make more confident and effective decisions that focuses their attention on activities that truly matter, and provide a consistent view of performance across the business.

To avoid this common pitfall of repeatedly creating useless performance reports that no one dares to read, finance needs to regularly engage with business leaders and take time to clearly understand what information they actually need to achieve their strategic objectives and consequently drive value.

Delivering this information in an efficient and effective manner is key to finance generating business trust as well as empowering the business to proactively respond to emerging opportunities and threats.

Lack of a Robust Data Governance Framework

After seriously discussing the problem of too many performance reports, my friend further raised an important question. What if a business leader requests a specific report and we do not have all the necessary information to adequately support our findings? Before answering him, I fired a question back at him. How are you currently handling these requests?

To my complete surprise he responded, finance produces reports that we believe are correct and if we do not hear back from the business leader all is considered in order. At this point in time, I was quickly reminded of the expression Garbage In – Garbage Out. No matter how logical our thinking and analysis is, as long as the inputs are invalid the results will be incorrect.

The same applies to business performance reporting. In today’s data-driven and tech-enabled economy, optimized and appropriate use of data is central to helping the business make enhanced decisions, create competitive advantage and successfully execute its strategy.

Thus, data quality is imperative, requiring finance leaders to ensure that there is absolute trust in the information provided to the business.

From discussing with my friend, it became clear that a business requires the right data to support its integrated set of defined key performance indicators (KPIs) and to maintain the integrity of this data, it must be supported by a robust governance structure.

Today’s volatile and dynamic business environment means the organization’s strategic priorities are always changing, as well as its information needs. As a result, the reporting function also needs to keep pace with this constantly changing landscape.

Building a cohesive information and data governance framework ensures common KPIs linked to strategic and operational decision making are used consistently across the business.

KPIs, regardless of their focus are only as consistent as the underlying data, and poor data input will produce inconsistent measures, even if they are labelled as the same KPI. This is why getting the basic data structures and data feeds right is so fundamental in providing decision support that can be trusted.

Additionally, due to the fact that different functions of the business use data for multiple different information needs, a robust data governance framework leads to a single version of the truth via enforcement of consistent information standards, creates awareness of where the performance data is housed and how it can be accessed.

Since the main goal of performance reporting is to provide management with real-time information with proactive comparators, a constant review of the information requirements and data governance framework ensures that performance measures remain relevant.

What I also picked up from my friend is that despite significant growth in the potential use of external data to drive better decision making, many businesses remain predominantly reliant on internal data to drive key business performance decisions.

They are grappling to incorporate this type of data across different business processes, mainly because of the differences in the structure of internal and external data sets.

By incorporating external comparators in their decision making processes, management will be able to identify areas where the business needs to ramp up through investments, and often more prominently, where it is already ahead of the competition, but must continue to focus on to uphold or create a new advantage.

Without this crucial information at their disposal, it is impractical for finance teams to clearly understand the major drivers of their business performance, produce insightful analysis, partner with key decision makers and support strategic decision making.

Business Leaders Discounting Finance’s Capabilities

In order to become effective business partners and provide relevant decision support it is imperative for finance teams to get as much exposure as possible to business-wide decision making. Unfortunately, getting this exposure remains a distant dream for many capable finance teams.

Because business leaders see finance personnel only as gatekeepers and not strategic business advisors, there is little motivation on their part to empower finance to collaborate effectively with the business on a larger scale.

As we started discussing the promises and perils of Industry 4.0 with my friend, he was very much surprised with how far behind his organization is in terms of digital transformation and process automation.

My friend is not alone on this boat; many finance teams are still stuck with legacy financial systems, tools and processes; spending a significant portion of their time on low value-adding transactional activities such as arduous data extraction and manipulation or traditional month-end activities, and little time on positive analysis and decision support. This is detrimental to effective performance reporting.

Performance reporting will only succeed if finance teams are suitably equipped to deliver high-quality insights that support decision making empowered with deployment of reporting technologies.

Even if the business presents an opportunity to collaborate, time alone is not sufficient. There is also a need to create an environment that allows finance people to develop appropriate capabilities, some of which may not come innately to many technical finance people.

One way of fostering this environment involves running finance training programmes that focus heavily on softer skills such as leadership development, communication, change management and stakeholder management, as well as on-the-job training for traits such as commercial acumen, and less on the technical or transactional processes which are easy candidates for automation and do not constitute a large portion of finance’s everyday job.

As with any other form of investment, the organization must be able to reap rewards from the training programmes. It makes no economic sense to spend substantial amount of resources trying to boost finance function productivity and in turn get rewarded with mediocre results.

It is therefore critical that finance personnel sent out for training exhibit the right behaviours and have the confidence to work with the business to interpret reports and constructively challenge strategic decision making to drive more effective decision making.

This in turn will assist finance shed its image as a mere service provider, elude mundane tasks, enhance its reputation and become part of the decision making crème de la crème informing business decisions with deep insights and recommendations.

In addition to training programmes, the organization also needs to invest in appropriate enabling technology that help with data analysis and interpretation in real-time, providing the organization with the necessary speed and quality that it requires to stay ahead, as well as allowing finance to demonstrate their analytical skills and become more influential as business partners.

Addressing the above common pitfalls is key to streamlining an organization’s performance measurement and reporting processes, and ensuring that senior management regularly receive relevant, insightful and near real-time information necessary to improve strategic decision making and ultimately business performance.

What other common pitfalls have you experienced in delivering high-quality performance reporting?

How Finance Can Improve at Influencing Business Decisions

These days the pressures and challenges a business faces are constantly changing and the finance function, along with the organization as a whole, must be ready to adapt.

Finance must act as a navigator and support business leaders with information and analysis about the organization’s position and course, contribute to strategic decision-making and enterprise performance improvement.

In other words, finance must partner more with the business and help create value.

To fulfill these new responsibilities, it is important for finance professionals to acquire a new blend of skills that will enable them to partner more effectively with other business areas and exert greater influence on the company’s strategic and operational decisions.

In order to remain relevant and become better at influencing business decisions, finance should do the following:

1. Embrace a forward-looking and commercial view of the business

Influencing business decisions goes beyond tracking and reporting the numbers (traditional financial reporting).

At the core of effective decision support is developing a deeper understanding of the drivers of these numbers and making these numbers work for the business.

Unlike conventional finance teams that focus on historical numbers, effective business advisors take a forward-looking and commercial view of the business and provide strategic insights based on industry and macro-economic trends and competitor dynamics that drive better business performance.

They combine various enterprise performance management (EPM) techniques and methods to examine business performance, interpret and explain to decision makers what the numbers mean for the long-term success of the organization.

It is this understanding of what is required to be effective in the role that differentiates successful effective business partners from the less successful ones.

2. Remain close enough to the business and its operations

Finance is increasingly being called upon to provide decision support on key strategic and operational decisions.

Thanks to automation, the majority of routine accounting processes are now automated and streamlined, leaving enough capacity for finance to focus on value-add activities.

Effective business partners have extensive business acumen that extends the realms of the finance function.

For example, they have a clearer understanding of sales, marketing, R&D, supply chain, and production, which enables them to proactively and confidently support these business areas.

They have a natural interest in the business and how the different parts of the organization fit together to complete the puzzle.

They are also inquisitive with a desire to understand a broad range of commercial and macro-economic issues and the implications these have on business performance.

Effective decision support professionals also have higher levels of credibility and trust with business leaders.

They are able to engage in extensive dialogue with decision makers, challenging constructively their assumptions and decisions to ensure the business is managed in the long-term interests of all stakeholders.

It is through these engagements with business leaders that effective finance business partners have managed to build a reputation for themselves and secured senior management business partnering buy-in.

3. Develop and improve on the soft skills necessary to fulfill the role

In addition to the core finance and accounting skills, key decision influencers also possess commercial insight and strategic thinking combined with influencing, communication and leadership skills.

Commercial insight enables them to stay abreast of developments in their company, industry and the wider economy. These insights in turn help the organization to proactively seize opportunities and mitigate any new threats.

Communication skills are essential for effectively presenting financial data and the decision it supports to non-finance people.

When invited to the decision table, effective business advisors are able to listen attentively to the ongoing dialogue, interpret correctly different scenarios, influence current choices and challenge management thinking to drive better decision-making.

In today’s dynamic environment, repeatedly asking key performance questions and challenging the status quo is key to making effective and reliable strategic and operational decisions.

Not every finance professional is destined to be a strategic business advisor. Some finance people are interested in the technical matters and therefore prefer working under SSC and COE models.

However, where the strategy and structure of your organization allows collaboration and views finance as a co-pilot, it is important that business leaders conduct a skills analysis gap to determine the skills currently available and those that are needed to build the business in the future.

This will help you strike the right balance between recruiting to bring new skills and developing existing finance team members to become effective co-pilots.

4. Know who your internal customers are

Effective finance teams have clear knowledge of who their internal customers are, and they are constantly working to ensure that the needs of these customers are met.

For example, the stakeholders that other finance professionals (such as business controller, financial accountant or reporting accountant) represent are different from those served by the business analyst.

Knowing who your customer is helps you focus your efforts only on those tasks that are critical to them and capable of adding value.

It is foolhardy to have a business performance analyst spend the majority of their time, say on account reconciliations, instead of on providing objective and independent analysis of how the business is performing and advising managers on what decisions must be made to improve performance.

5. Focus on continuous improvement

Transforming finance into an effective decision support function is not a once-off project with a start and an end date.

Instead, this is a continuous process aimed at focusing resources and finance talent on activities where they can have a real impact.

It’s important to have a set of performance measures that are monitored and evaluated against goals in specific decision areas, as this will help you to monitor progress, highlight performance misses, and determine ways of improving.

Since the decision influencers are always close to the business, it’s also important to regularly seek feedback from business managers to see if they are meeting their expectations.

Becoming great at influencing key business decisions is not about the title one holds, rather, it is about continuously adding strategic and operational value to the business.

Finance in the Digital Age

The face of the finance function is changing every day but do we really understand what this means in reality? I love to mentor young professionals and offer them advice that can help them propel their careers forward. One of the many questions I often get asked is “With all the technological advancements taking place, what does this mean for current and future finance professionals, including the finance function as a whole?”

A lot has been written about the current digital revolution taking over specific jobs performed by humans and making them redundant. One of the jobs being accounting and finance. No wonder finance professionals are worried whether they will still be in employment in the next five years, ten years or not too distant future.

Think of robotics, artificial intelligence and machine learning. These new technologies can replicate humans and perform rules-based, repetitive activities.

Traditionally, finance professionals joined the finance organization via the accounting route. An individual would go to university, earn a Bachelors in Commerce, upon graduating register with a professional accounting body such as ACCA, CIMA, CPA and CMA. Undergo a three-year training program and bingo, your finance career is birthed.

Fast-forward to the current digital age. The finance landscape has significantly changed. Rapid environmental changes, shifting customer behaviours and technological breakthroughs are all turning business models upside-down and upending conventional wisdom. This new operating model demands finance professionals to have a different skill set.

Having technical competences alone is no longer a hundred percent determinant for success.

We now live and conduct business in a hugely connected and better informed world. Thanks to social media and IoT. Social media is allowing us to stay in touch with colleagues hundreds of miles away from us. Through IoT, buildings and other items are now technologically connected allowing data to be gathered, exchanged and analysed to generate key decision-making insights.

Cloud is Driving Finance Transformation

Cloud-based applications are enabling CFOs to do more with less, at the same time modernizing and transforming finance. These solutions have the capability to integrate external data and optimize decision-making. They allow finance executives to have full data visibility, identify correlations and trends, as well as key drivers of operational performance and financial outcomes.

One example of cloud-based solution that is making waves is Syft, a cloud analytics platform that directly links into your existing accounting cloud software and instantly generates easy to interpret graphs and reports for your business.

The challenge for many CFOs today is unlocking critical business insights from their data. The insights they are looking for lay buried in disconnected, legacy ERP systems that are struggling to keep pace with today’s information needs of the business. Most of these legacy systems operate in silos and do not communicate with each other.

In the ongoing digital revolution, integration is the new information paradigm. Where silos were the norm, organizations today must seek to share critical data among business operations to manage costs and coalesce company strategy.

Not only does cloud integrate external data, it also simplifies the cost structure of the business, help forecast with greater precision and potentially close books faster. In addition to having analytics embedded within the applications, these cloud-based financial systems are designed from the ground with the end-users’ real-time information requirements in mind.

This is different from the traditional ERP systems that lack customer specifications and customization, and are build for standard adoption. In today’s information age, organizations have different information needs, specific to their strategic direction and are not keen on adopting the herd mentality.

Investing in cloud computing and SaaS often results in reduced finance and IT costs mainly because of reduced up-front capital expenditures. With cloud-based applications, the focus shifts from capital expenditures to operational expenditures (subscription-based) as there is no need to have the financial system set up on business premises.

Unlike traditional, on premise financial systems which require the software providers’ IT support team to visit your offices to service or upgrade the system, cloud-based platforms are easily updated remotely allowing you to always work with the latest version, with current features and functionality.

This way, you avoid getting billed for call-out fees and other unnecessary servicing costs.

Reinventing the Finance Function’s Wheel

Technology alone is not the silver bullet, it is an enabler and empowers finance professionals. Rather than look at the ills of this new digital age, why not look at the opportunities presented? Higher demands are being placed on finance to transition from a back office reporter of the past to a trusted business advisor.

In most companies, finance is spending considerable time and effort gathering data and getting to the right numbers instead of analyzing what the numbers mean. In these organizations, a lot of emphasis is placed on transactional processing and reconciliations as opposed to insightful analysis.

Thanks to the digital revolution, finance has an opportunity to move up the value chain. But what does this digital transformation really mean? Does this mean entirely changing what finance does within the business? No. Finance is a decision support function to the business and will always remain so.

What digital transformation means for finance is that the function should take stock of its current deliverables, evaluate priority areas and establish where value should be delivered most, and how, arguably by leveraging new technologies.

This also involves building upon the existing talent and skills. Individuals with a strong technical background still have their place within the function. But what we are saying is that the organization’s talent base must be fit for purpose in this digital age, and aligned to areas of value creation.

Having a finance workforce that is tech savvy, diverse, connected, curious about how the business works, asks the right operational and commercial questions, and understands the application of disruptive digital technologies to drive automation and insight will differentiate great finance functions from those that are simply good.

Build a Positive Business Case for Digital Investment

Companies that have fully grasped the opportunities presented by the current digital revolution are allocating significant resources to IT budgets. The future finance function will have robotics and automation at the core. It is therefore advisable that CFOs jump on the train before it passes through their station.

Just because your organization is not investing in digital does not mean that your competitors are also not. Lessons can be learnt from the demises of Kodak, Blackberry, Borders and Nokia, only to mention a few. These companies failed to set pace in a rapidly changing technological environment and they all paid dearly for their slumber.

CFOs must therefore build a robust strategic business case for investing in digital and the advantages of harnessing its power. This helps secure the much-needed buy in from senior management. The later group must be made aware why it is critical for the organization to transition to the current digital ecosystem.

If the CFO is able to articulate the complexities the business is currently facing and how they can be addressed by investing in digital, then getting the thumbs up from senior management will not be very onerous.

This is a make or break time for many organizations. The ball is in your court, to either maintain your old-fashioned systems or inadequate business processes or invest in today’s modern systems for future strategic success.

Finance’s Role in Managing Enterprise Risks

The risk landscape is changing fast. Risks are multiplying at an alarming rate threatening to cause both financial and reputation ruin to the business. Because of this increasing risk complexity, there is a heightened focus on effective risk management.

Senior management and board members are consistently looking for a deeper understanding of the organization’s risk profile and how various risks to the business are managed.

Risk management is an enabler of higher level performance.

Without taking risks, organizations cannot grow and achieve strategic success. Risk is no longer something to only dread, minimize and avoid. Instead, leading organizations are using risk management activities to create value and help them improve their businesses.

It is therefore critical to ensure that efforts to mitigate the downside impact of risks are coordinated with efforts to manage risks that support business growth.

As a strategic thinker, the CFO should play an important role in helping other executives and the board get a deeper understanding of the organization’s key risks and risk management capabilities. He or she can help build an ERM framework that is entrenched in the organization’s management processes and functions.

A well-structured and coordinated ERM framework provides support and guidance on risk management activities, helps identify and manage enterprise risks holistically and makes risk consideration an inherent part of key decision-making processes. On the contrary, a siloed approach to managing risks exposes the business to significant risks and value erosion.

Unfortunately, in most organizations, risk management is a disjointed process. Multiple functions are managing one or more aspects of the company’s risk profile, and there is minimal coordination with each other. For instance, each function carries out its own risk assessment process using different risk terminologies, methodologies and reporting practices. Decision makers are overwhelmed with more than one versions of the truth.

The problem with this approach is that it often leads to confusion on the true meaning of risk, duplication of efforts, unnecessary bureaucracy and costs and poor risk decision-making processes.

When there is a common risk language across the enterprise better decisions are made, for example, concerning market entry, new products and acquisitions. This often leads to reduced earnings fluctuations and increased stakeholder confidence.

Build a clear picture of significant risks.

As the role of the CFO continues to evolve into a more business-partnering one, it is imperative that the finance organization is rightly equipped to proactively identify all the potential risks and defend their businesses.

What are the key risks to the achievement of your business objectives? Do you have the required risk management capabilities to address this risk profile? Who is responsible for monitoring and reporting risk information to decision makers?

Thus, the CFO and his team need to consistently assess, improve and monitor the way the organization manages its evolving risk profile. The risk assessment process must provide actionable and real-time insights on inherent risks and link them to the organization’s objectives, initiatives and business processes.

A thorough risk assessment process helps identify and prioritize risks that require urgent monitoring and mitigation. It also allows for the testing of existing internal controls and identification of opportunities for improving controls and risk mitigation strategies.

On the other hand, insufficient risk management processes can lead to costly lawsuits, significant financial losses, massive reputational damage and fly-by-night financial reporting, which can raise fundamental questions about the business as whole, its management team and viability.

An effective continuous risk assessment and management system therefore requires the team given the responsibility to do so to develop thorough knowledge of the company’s strategic objectives, operations, products, services, risk history, internal environment and its external environment.

Some organizations are leveraging data analytics tools to access forward-looking data from a range of sources, generate insights about changing market conditions and behavioural changes, evaluate metrics and integrate this real-time information to build risk models and forecasts as well as comprehensive risk strategies.

Coordinate and align business processes.

Risk management activities should be a key element of normal business operations. For this to happen, there must be top management buy-in to the business case for embedding risk strategy into the day-to-day running of the business as well as enhancing risk management performance.

It is therefore important to receive clear communication, proper oversight and accountability from senior management and the board concerning risk and governance. This will ensure that a common risk framework and universe is embraced and implemented across the organization.

Maturity models and benchmarks of leading practices can be used to help management determine the existing state of their organization’s risk management capabilities and define the desired state.

As one of the organization’s senior executives, the CFO should play a leading role in defining risk management objectives and embedding risk principles into the business processes. They can leverage their analytical and communication skills to broadcast to the business the benefits of risk management and the disadvantages of inadequate risk management processes.

The CFO plays a critical role in establishing the organization’s risk appetite, determining how the business will measure risk and ensures risk taking is within the acceptable risk thresholds of the organization.

By regularly reporting risk information and coverage to business unit managers, a risk aware culture is embedded in everyday business practices, and this in turn will help business managers understand the implications of their decisions on business performance.

I welcome your thoughts and comments.

© 2019 ERPM Insights

Theme by Anders NorénUp ↑